The Times, 4th Jan 1871:

The nomination of candidates for the representation of the county Meath was held yesterday in the Court-house Trim. The opposition attempted at the last moment to give life and interest to proceedings which were expected to unusually dull. The town was dressed in the “national” garb. The people wore green leaves in their hats, and the streets were decked with evergreens formed into arches and fanciful devices, with inscriptions expressing the popular sentiment, such as “Vote for Martin” and “Home Rule” and other similar matters...

The Hon. Mr. Plunkett’s friends occupied one of the side galleries in the Court-house. Among them were about 30 Roman Catholic clergymen...

.......The contest is, to a large extent, one between the priests and the people, the latter being unwilling to have a candidate selected for them, the former having their power increased by the extent of territorial influence arranged on their side. Mr. Martin was proposed by Mr Patrick Brady a farmer of Navan, who recommended him as the man who had “Stepped into the place of John Mitchell, when he was convicted by a partisan Judge and a perjured jury.” The audience testified by cheers and waving of hats that this was regarded as a high compliment. Mr. Patrick Smith, also of Navan, another farmer seconded the nomination. The Rev. Mr. Dowling P.P. went through the pantomimic form of addressing the assembly, but could not obtain a hearing amidst the hooting and groaning which was kept up while he spoke. He was understood to propose Mr. Plunkett; Mr. Patrick Heary, D.L., J.P., seconded the nomination...........

........... A show of hands was taken, which was declared to be in favour of Mr. Martin, and a poll was demanded for Plunkett, which will be taken on Thursday........

 

The Times, 6th Jan 1871:

Mr. Martin has been returned for the county of Meath, the numbers being- For Martin, 1128; for Plunkett, 642. Mr. Martin had large majorities in Trim, Navan and Kells, a small majority in Duleek, and a minority in Oldcastle and Dunshaughlin. The returns during the day were as follows;- At Navan at half two o’clock, Martin had polled 278 and Plunkett 74; at Kells at 3 o’clock, Martin had polled 213 and Plunkett 131; at Trim at 2 o’clock, Martin had polled 317 and Plunkett 41; at Oldcastle there was said to be a majority of 12 for Plunkett. There has been no disturbance. Early in the day a large number of Martinates entered Navan carrying green flags and evergreens. Large forces of police and military were busily employed all day in keeping order, an additional troop of dragoons having been telegraphed for and obtained from Dundalk. By noon the voting went on slowly until half past 12, when hundreds of voters began to come in from the country on cars to vote for Martin, for whom there was great enthusiasm.

 

The Times, 3rd April 1875:

John Martin M.P., born September 5, 1812, died March 29, 1875. Buried in Donaghmore Presbyterian cemetery, Newry.

A preliminary meeting of the electors of the County Meath was held to-day in Navan at which resolutions were passed expressing regret at Mr. Martin’s death and condolence with the family. It was arranged that another meeting should be held on Tuesday next to choose a successor. Mr. C. Stuart Parnell has addressed the constituency declaring himself an advocate of denominational education and Home Rule.