Ordnance Survey Field Name Book 1835 – 1836

Parish of Martry (Civil Parish )


Martraigh, a place where people were slaughtered. Peter O’ Daly.

Martry.     John O’Donovan.

Martery.  Down Survey.

Martery.  Civil Survey.

This parish is situated in the northwest part of the barony of Lower Navan. It is bounded on the north by Teltown Parish; East by Donaghmore and Ardbraccan; South by Clonmacduff and Rathmore parishes; and west by Rathmore and Balrathboyne parishes.

It contains 3890 acres 3 roods 7 perches statute measure, of which 338 ½ acres are bog. The Dublin and Kells Coach road passes through it, and the Blackwater river forms its northern boundary.

Townlands.

ALLENSTOWN Demesne.

Baile Aillin, Allen’s town.

Allenstown   J.O’D.

Allenston     Inq. Temp. Car. 1.

Allinstowne   Down Survey.

Allinstowne   Civil Survey.

This townland  is bounded on the north by Banestown townland and Balrathboyne parish; East by the townlands of Pheonixtown, Oldtown and Faughanhill; South by Jordanstown and Rodstown townlands; and West by Rathmore parish. It is 4 miles southeast of Kells.

It is the property of W. Waller,Esq., and contains 652 acres 3 roods 36 perches. It is occupied as the demesne of the proprietor, whose residence is in it. The Kells and Trim road passes through it, and there is a bye road along its southern border. It contains a small deer park and an old graveyard.

Banestown

Behan or Beyan is a family name.

Banestown   J.O’D.

Beanstowne  Down Survey.

In the N.W. extremity of the parish, 3 miles S.E of Kells. It is bounded on the N. And W. By Balrathboyne Parish; and S. And E. By Allenstown Demesne.

It is the property of C.A Tisdall, Esq., and contains 93 acres, 2 roods 26 perches, all under pastute. The Kells and Trim road passes along its eastern boundary. It has a large quarry and two clumps of plantation; but there is no house in it.

Castlemartin

Caislean Mairtin, martin’s castle.

Castlemartin.  J.O’D.

Castlemarten. Inq. Temp. Jac. 1.

Castle Martin. Down Survey.

Castlemartin.  Civil Survey.

It is situated on the eastern extremity of the parish, 4 ½ miles south east of Kells. It is bounded on the north by the Blackwater river, which divides it from Teltown  parish; East by Donaghmore parish; South by Ardbraccan parish; and West by the townlands of Pheonixtown and Martry.

It is the property of W. Waller, Esq., and contains 408 acres 3 roods 11 perches statute measure.. The Kells to Navan road and the Trim – Donaghpatrick road passes through it. A hill in its centre is 198 feet above the sea level, and the Blackwater river, where it leaves the townland is 137 feet above the same level.

Faughan  Hill

Mullach Fochain, hill of the provender.

Faughanhill J.O’D.

Mullyfaughan. Local.

Faughan Hill.   Local.

On the eastern boundary of the parish, 5 miles south east of Kells. It is bounded on the north by Pheonistown townland; East by Ardbraccan parish; South by Greetiagh townland; and West by the townlands of Allenstown and Oldtown.

It is the property of W. Waller, Esq., and contains 159 acres 2 roods 25 perches, of which 11 ½ acres are plantation. The Kells and Trim road passes along its South West boundary, and a bye road along its west side. Its highest ground, called Mullyfaughan, is on its eastern boundary and is 366 feet above sea level.

Glebe

It is situated near the centre of Martry townland.

It is the property of the Bishop of Meath, and contains 20 acres, 3 roods, 11 perches. The ruins of an old church and an old graveyard are in its northern part. Two bye roads form its southern and western boundaries.

Greetagh Commons

Groidhteach, a place where cattle graze together; or,

Groidh, cattle, and Teach, a house.

“This is not a commonage, although generally known by the name of Greetagh Commons.”  Boundary Survey sketch map.

Greetiagh.    J.O’D.

Greetague.  Local.

In the southern extremity of the parish, 5 miles south east of Kells. It is bounded on the north by the townland of Faughanhill; East by Ardbraccan parish; South by Clonmacduff parish; and west by the townlands of Herbertstown and Jordanstown.

It is the property of W. Waller, Esq., and contains 226 acres, 0 roods, 9 perches, of which 148 acres are bog. The Kells and Trim road passes along its northern boundary, and a bye road along its east side.

Herbertstown

Herbert is a family name.

Herbertstown. J.O’D.

Herbertstowne.  Down Survey.

Herberstowne Civil Survey.

In the south part of the parish, 4 ½ miles north east of Athboy.

It is the property of Edward Rotherham, Esq., and is let by lease renewable for ever to W. Waller , Esq. It contains 572 acres, 2 roods, 8 perches, of which 186 acres are bog, in its southern part, is 242 feet above sea level.

Jordanstown

Jordan is a family name. Baile Shiurtan.

Jordanstown. J.O’D.

Jordanstowne.  Civil Survey.

In the southern part of the parish 4 ¼ miles north east of Athboy and 5 ½ miles south east of Kells. It is bounded on the north by Allenstown Demesne;  east by Greetiagh townland; south by Herbertstown townland; and west by Rodstown townland.It is the property of W. Waller, Esq., and contains 148 acres, 1 rood, 18 perches, all cultivated and divided into 3 fields only. The Kells and Trim road touches its north eastern extremity. It contains a large quarry.

Martry

In the north part of the parish, 4 ½ miles east south east of Kells. It is bounded on the north by Teltown parish; east by Teltown parish and Castlemartin townland; south by Pheonixtown townland; and north by Balrathboyne parish.

It is the property of C.A Tisdall, Esq., and contains 754 acres, 1 rood, 39 perches, all good arable land. The Kells and Navan road passes through it, and bye roads traverse it in various directions. It contains the Glebe, a police station, a school house, a square fort, and a corn mill.

Oldtown

Sean Bhaile, old town.

Oldtown. J.O’D.

In the centre of the parish, 4 ½ miles south east of Kells. It is bounded on the north by Pheonixtown townland; east by Faughanhill townland; and south and west by Allenstown townland.It is the property of W. Waller, Esq., and contains 170 acres, 1 rood, 3 perches, all good arable land. The Kells and Trim road passes along its southern boundary and a bye road along its eastern side.

Pheonixtown

Baile na bhFionnog, town of the ravens.

Now universally called Pheonixtown. J.O’D.

Fenwickstown. Down Survey.

Fenwickstowne. Civil Survey.

There is a great deal of comfort and beauty too in making a Fionnog (a raven) a Pheonix !!. J. O’D., a Bible Reader.

Phenockstown. Inq. Temp. Jac. 1.

Moryson informs us that there were no black crown in Ireland in his time ( 1602 ), but that there were Fenoges or Roystons.

This townland is situated in the centre of the parish, 3 ¾ miles south east of Kells. It is bounded on the north by Martry townland; east by Castlemartin townland and Ardbraccan parish; south by the townlands of of Oldtown and Faughanhill;  and west by Allenstown Demesne and the parish of Balrathboyne.

It is the property of C.A. Tisdall, Esq., and is let by lease forever to Edward Rotherham, Esq., It contains 440 acres, 3 roods, 5 perches, all good arable land, of which 5 ½ acres are plantation. Two bye roads pass through it.

Rodstown

Rodde is a family name.

Rodstown.  J.O’D.

Rodstowne.  Down Survey.

Roddstowne. Civil Survey.

In the west part of the parish, 4 ½ miles south south east of Kells. It is bounded on the north by Allenstown Demesne; east by Jordanstown; south by Herbertstown townland; and west by Rathmore parish.

It is the property of W. Waller, Esq., and contains 263 acres 0 roods, 27 perches. It is part of the demesne of Allenstown,and contains 15 ½ acres of plantation and a Decoy ( pond with narrow netted arms into which wild duck mat be tempted and caught ). A bye road forms its northern boundary.

Miscellaneous Features

Allenstown House.

In Allenstown Demesne.

The residence of W. Waller, Esq.. A good house, situated in a neat and well laid out demesne.

Clifton Lodge.

No particulars given.

End of the parish of Martry.

~~~

Martry Mill

Martry Mill on the River Blackwater, approximately half-way between Navan and Kells, is the only operational water-powered corn mill on the Boyne river system and is one of the last such in Ireland.

Recorded as early as 1641 and kept in excellent repair over the centuries, it offers an opportunity to watch a timeless industrial process carried on in the traditional manner, with mill stones driven by very old but efficient gearing, all turned by the water-wheel outside.